A Bioenergy Expert For 25 Cents A Week?

Are you tired of superficial, imbalanced, and inaccurate reporting by the media on the issues you care about most?

If so, what’s your budget for supporting in-depth and credible independent media sources dedicated to getting you the whole story?

If your answer is zero – and, for many of us, it is – then the domination of corporate and/or agenda-driven news sources should be no surprise.

As you know, the topic of energy is central to nearly everything going on in the world today. And keeping abreast of the latest developments in renewable energy is crucial to anyone with an interest in climate change and the environment.

But it’s impossible stay informed on renewable energy if you’re ignoring bioenergy, nearly half of all renewables in the U.S.!

Now in our ninth year of publication, The Biomass Monitor covers the latest science along with the entire spectrum of views on bioenergy, biomass, and biofuels, the most popular – and controversial – source of renewable energy.

Of course, The Biomass Monitor isn’t the only outlet reporting on bioenergy. Mainstream and alternative media occasionally cover the topic, though it’s typically done by journalists with a limited grasp of the relevant science, quoting the same handful of voices in a “he said, she said” fashion.

Environmental advocacy newsletters and industry trade journals make important contributions to our understanding of bioenergy, however each do so with their own particular bias and slant.

Only The Biomass Monitor provides balanced and comprehensive investigative reporting, a digest of mainstream and alternative news articles, and a wide variety of views – from scientists to industry to advocacy groups – all in a single publication, one stop shopping for all your bioenergy needs!

Keep your fingers on the pulse of bioenergy by subscribing to email issues of The Biomass Monitor for as low as $15 a year!

If $15 sounds steep, I understand. In these tough economic times, many of us are strapped for cash. But I ask you to consider what else $15 a year can get you.

For $15 you can get a single meal at a restaurant. On a monthly basis, we’re talking about just over a dollar a month – what you tip a barista for coffee or the bartender for beer.

That’s four cents a day! Chances are you’ve left that much in the “give a penny, take a penny” dish at the convenience store.

If you care about renewable energy, climate, forests, public health, and economics, then no matter your take on the energy source, you care about bioenergy.

So why not become a bioenergy expert by subscribing today (via PayPal or check — see below) for a year’s worth of issues of The Biomass Monitor at the low price of only $15 for individuals, $20 for nonprofits, and $25 for businesses?

Sincerely,

Josh Schlossberg, Editor (Denver, Colorado)
Samantha Chirillo, Associate Editor (Eugene, Oregon)

Editorial Board:
Roy Keene, Forester
Brett Leuenberger, Student
Dr. Brian Moench, Physician
Jon Rhodes, Hydrologist
George Wuerthner, Ecologist

images-22

1 Year Individual Subscription – $15

paypal_subscribe_150

1 Year Nonprofit Subscription – $20

paypal_subscribe_150

1 Year Business Subscription – $25

paypal_subscribe_150

To subscribe via check, please email thebiomassmonitor@gmail.com for details.

[NEWS] Maine Governor Will Oppose Borrowing Aimed at Helping Biomass Industry

– by Scott Thistle, January 10, 2018, Portland Press Herald

maine-biomass_ben-mccanna

Photo: Ben McCanna / Press Herald

Gov. Paul LePage told lawmakers he opposes a pair of bills that would have taxpayers fund a $45 million subsidy to help Maine’s foundering biomass industry.

In a rare appearance before the Legislature’s budget-writing Appropriations Committee, LePage said the Legislature should focus instead on ways of creating industries that bring greater value from the state’s more than 18 million acres of forest lands.

The bills to support investments and a low-interest revolving loan fund come less than two years after the Legislature passed a $13.4 million taxpayer-funded bailout of the industry that LePage reluctantly supported at the time.

Read more

[NEWS] Trash-to-Biofuel Facility Set to Open in Maine

– by Alex Acquisto, January 5, 2018, Bangor Daily News

Fiberight larger
The company behind a state-of-the-art solid waste disposal facility in Hampden designed to convert trash into biofuel has secured enough funding to begin operations in May.

Craig Stuart-Paul, CEO of Maryland-based Fiberight LLC, announced this week that his company has secured $70 million for a municipal solid waste center off Coldbrook Road — $45 million through a tax-exempt bond with the Finance Authority of Maine and the remainder in private equity funds.

Read more

[NEWS] Questions As U.S. Wood Pellet Makers Expand Production

– by Jacqueline Froelich, January 1, 2017, NPR

wood pellets 600The wood pellet fuel industry is growing in the United States. The largest chip mills across the South are gobbling up hardwood forests to meet demand for overseas customers.

KELLY MCEVERS, HOST:

Wood Pellets are big business. U.S. companies send almost a billion dollars worth of wood pellets to the European Union, which uses them to power energy plants. But the appetite overseas for wood pellets has conservationists in the U.S. worried about our forests. Arkansas Public Media’s Jacqueline Froelich reports.

Read more

[NEWS] With Biomass Energy, Weighing Forest Restoration and Carbon Emissions

– by Emery Cowan, January 5, 2017, Arizona Daily Sun

feller-buncher_jake-bacon

Photo: Jake Bacon / Arizona Daily Sun

When state utility regulators held a workshop last month about increasing the use of forest biomass for power, one topic did not make it into the discussion: the emissions produced from burning small trees, branches and treetops hauled from Arizona’s forests.

Compared to coal, burning biomass emits lower amounts of key pollutants like sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides, but it generally equals or surpasses coal in the amount of carbon dioxide it emits per unit of heat.

Read more

[NEWS] How a Trash Incinerator Became “Green” Energy

– by Scott Dance, December 15, 2017, Baltimore Sun

bal-the-greenwashing-of-trash-jerry-jackson-baltimore-sun

Photo: Jerry Jackson / Baltimore Sun

A trash incinerator in Southwest Baltimore is the city’s largest single source of air pollution. But a state law has nonetheless allowed it to collect roughly $10 million in subsidies over the past six years through a program intended to promote green energy.

Few commuters who pass the imposing white smokestack on Interstate 95 have any idea that the plant burns their household waste, that their electric bills help to maintain it, or that it releases thousands of pounds of greenhouse gases and toxic substances — carbon dioxide, hydrochloric acid, formaldehyde among them — into the air every year.

Read more

[NEWS] Plans Launched for Minnesota Biomass Processing Facility

– December 6, 2017, Waste360

Meridian-truck-st.louis-2017_0

Photo: Waste360

Solid waste services company Meridian Waste Solutions Inc. continued a flurry of recent activity with the announcement that its wholly-owned subsidiary, Attis Innovations (formerly Meridian Innovations), has initiated commercialization plans for it first biomass processing facility in Minnesota.

Attis will immediately begin feedstock evaluation and assess potential locations for commercial scale operations.

Read more

[NEWS] Minnesota Regulators Approve Plan to Close Three Biomass Facilities

– by Mike Hughlett, November 30, 2017, Star Tribune

Iron Range biomass _KBJR

Photo: KBJR

Minnesota utility regulators on Thursday approved Xcel Energy’s plan that will result in closing three biomass electricity generators.

The move will save ratepayers money but will also lead to some economic distress for the timber and turkey farming industries.

Xcel plans to buy and close a plant in the western Minnesota town of Benson, which burns turkey manure to produce electricity. The Minneapolis-based utility will also buy out its contract to purchase power from two wood-burning plants on the Iron Range.

Read more

« Older Entries