A Bioenergy Expert For 25 Cents A Week?

Are you tired of superficial, imbalanced, and inaccurate reporting by the media on the issues you care about most?

If so, what’s your budget for supporting in-depth and credible independent media sources dedicated to getting you the whole story?

If your answer is zero – and, for many of us, it is – then the domination of corporate and/or agenda-driven news sources should be no surprise.

As you know, the topic of energy is central to nearly everything going on in the world today. And keeping abreast of the latest developments in renewable energy is crucial to anyone with an interest in climate change and the environment.

But it’s impossible stay informed on renewable energy if you’re ignoring bioenergy, nearly half of all renewables in the U.S.!

Now in our seventh year of publication, The Biomass Monitor covers the latest science along with the entire spectrum of views on bioenergy, biomass, and biofuels, the most popular – and controversial – source of renewable energy.

Of course, The Biomass Monitor isn’t the only outlet reporting on bioenergy. Mainstream and alternative media occasionally cover the topic, though it’s typically done by journalists with a limited grasp of the relevant science, quoting the same handful of voices in a “he said, she said” fashion.

Environmental advocacy newsletters and industry trade journals make important contributions to our understanding of bioenergy, however each do so with their own particular bias and slant.

Only The Biomass Monitor provides balanced and comprehensive investigative reporting, a digest of mainstream and alternative news articles, and a wide variety of views – from scientists to industry to advocacy groups – all in a single publication, one stop shopping for all your bioenergy needs!

Keep your fingers on the pulse of bioenergy by subscribing to email issues of The Biomass Monitor for as low as $15 a year!

If $15 sounds steep, I understand. In these tough economic times, many of us are strapped for cash. But I ask you to consider what else $15 a year can get you.

For $15 you can get a single meal at a restaurant. On a monthly basis, we’re talking about just over a dollar a month – what you tip a barista for coffee or the bartender for beer.

That’s four cents a day! Chances are you’ve left that much in the “give a penny, take a penny” dish at the convenience store.

If you care about renewable energy, climate, forests, public health, and economics, then no matter your take on the energy source, you care about bioenergy.

So why not become a bioenergy expert by subscribing today (via PayPal or check — see below) for a year’s worth of issues of The Biomass Monitor at the low price of only $15 for individuals, $20 for nonprofits, and $25 for businesses?

Sincerely,

Josh Schlossberg, Editor-in-Chief (Denver, Colorado)
Samantha Chirillo, Associate Editor (Eugene, Oregon)

Editorial Board:
Roy Keene, Forester
Brett Leuenberger, Student
Dr. Brian Moench, Physician
Jon Rhodes, Hydrologist
George Wuerthner, Ecologist

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1 Year Individual Subscription – $15

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1 Year Nonprofit Subscription – $20

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1 Year Business Subscription – $25

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To subscribe via check, please email thebiomassmonitor@gmail.com for details.

[NEWS] Hawaii Biomass Facility Reaches Agreement with Utility Over Power Purchase

– by H.J. Mai, May 10, 2017, Pacific Business News

hu honua pacific business journal

Photo: Hu Honua Bioenergy

Hu Honua Bioenergy LLC said on Wednesday that it has reached an agreement with Hawaii Electric Light Co. on an amended power purchase agreement for its half-completed biomass plant on the Big Island.

HELCO agreed to revised terms for electricity to be produced by the biomass project and is submitting the amended contract to the Hawaii Public Utilities Commission for approval of Hu Honua’s proposed pricing, according to a company statement.

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[NEWS] Washington Governor Signs Legislation Encouraging Biomass Power

– May 17, 2017, The Daily World

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Graphic: NREL

Gov. Jay Inslee today signed legislation encouraging the production of renewable energy at older, fire-generated biomass facilities.

Senate Bill 5128, sponsored by Sen. Dean Takko, D-Longview, will allow qualified mills to sell excess power generated by the burning of biomass, such as the fiber remains from timber or pulp, to local public utilities districts. The new law will help older facilities lower power costs by using renewable energy sources.

“Allowing paper mills like Longview’s KapStone, which employs 1,100 people, to sell off excess power will help keep jobs in our rural communities,” said Takko.

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[NEWS] Maine Biomass Facility Didn’t Run in April

– by Darren Fishell, May 5, 2017, Bangor Daily News

Destined for biomass

Photo: Bangor Daily News

Stored Solar, a biomass plant that qualified for taxpayer subsidies has been offline for more than a month as the company says it tries to retool its plans at the facility.

Company spokesman Dan Cashman last week said that a boiler leak and wood supply problems during the muddy late spring led the company to close the wood-to-energy plant and analyze their operations.

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[NEWS] Is Burning Wood for Electricity a Good Idea?

– by Robert McClure, May 3, 2017, Undark

woody biomass undarkThe idea that to generate electricity should be considered climate-friendly has been debated by scientists and politicians for years. Advocates, including many scientists, ask what could be more sustainable than burning trees? They drink in planet-warming gasses while growing, and give it back up when they are burned — a perfect closed loop with no net emissions. Critics, on the other hand — including other researchers — say the science is much more complicated than all that, and that when managed poorly, woody biomass power could be worse for the climate than coal.

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[NEWS] Xcel and Benson, MN Agree on Plan to Mitigate Biomass Facility Closure

– by Elizabeth Dunbar, April 3, 2017, Minnesota Public Radio

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Photo: Tim Post / MPR

Xcel Energy and the western Minnesota city of Benson have reached an agreement on a plan to mitigate the expected closure of a biomass power plant that burns turkey litter.

Benson Power, owned by a group of investors, started producing electricity in 2007, helping Xcel fulfill a legislative mandate dating back to a 1994 settlement over nuclear waste storage at its Prairie Island plant. But Xcel says biomass power now costs up to 10 times more than new wind power, and city officials said the plant could close within a couple years.

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[NEWS] Washington Governor Delays Action on Biomass Bill

– May 8, 2017, The Daily News

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Photo: John Walker / Fresno Bee

At the last minute Monday, the administration of Gov. Jay Inslee delayed a decision on a bill that would help KapStone’s Longview pulp mill profit from production of renewable biomass energy.

Inslee initially was expected to sign the bill Monday morning, but his office withdrew it for further review and rescheduled it for his signature May 16, the governor’s press office said. Spokeswoman Tara Lee said the governor still is expected to sign the measure, but she said nothing is certain until it is inked.

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[NEWS] Port Angeles, Washington Biomass Facility Shut Down

– by Paul Gottlieb, April 21, 2017, Peninsula Daily News

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Photo: Keith Thorpe / Peninsula Daily News

The former Nippon Paper Industries USA cogeneration plant has been shut down and eight of its workers laid off as the paper mill breathed its last breath — in its present form — for up to 18 months, McKinley Paper Co. spokeswoman Cathy Price said Monday.

Price, Nippon’s former human resources manager, is now filling that role with Mexican-owned McKinley, which purchased the mill March 31 from Japanese-owned Nippon for $20.6 million.

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