A Bioenergy Expert For 25 Cents A Week?

Are you tired of superficial, imbalanced, and inaccurate reporting by the media on the issues you care about most?

If so, what’s your budget for supporting in-depth and credible independent media sources dedicated to getting you the whole story?

If your answer is zero – and, for many of us, it is – then the domination of corporate and/or agenda-driven news sources should be no surprise.

As you know, the topic of energy is central to nearly everything going on in the world today. And keeping abreast of the latest developments in renewable energy is crucial to anyone with an interest in climate change and the environment.

But it’s impossible stay informed on renewable energy if you’re ignoring bioenergy, nearly half of all renewables in the U.S.!

Now in our ninth year of publication, The Biomass Monitor covers the latest science along with the entire spectrum of views on bioenergy, biomass, and biofuels, the most popular – and controversial – source of renewable energy.

Of course, The Biomass Monitor isn’t the only outlet reporting on bioenergy. Mainstream and alternative media occasionally cover the topic, though it’s typically done by journalists with a limited grasp of the relevant science, quoting the same handful of voices in a “he said, she said” fashion.

Environmental advocacy newsletters and industry trade journals make important contributions to our understanding of bioenergy, however each do so with their own particular bias and slant.

Only The Biomass Monitor provides balanced and comprehensive investigative reporting, a digest of mainstream and alternative news articles, and a wide variety of views – from scientists to industry to advocacy groups – all in a single publication, one stop shopping for all your bioenergy needs!

Keep your fingers on the pulse of bioenergy by subscribing to email issues of The Biomass Monitor for as low as $15 a year!

If $15 sounds steep, I understand. In these tough economic times, many of us are strapped for cash. But I ask you to consider what else $15 a year can get you.

For $15 you can get a single meal at a restaurant. On a monthly basis, we’re talking about just over a dollar a month – what you tip a barista for coffee or the bartender for beer.

That’s four cents a day! Chances are you’ve left that much in the “give a penny, take a penny” dish at the convenience store.

If you care about renewable energy, climate, forests, public health, and economics, then no matter your take on the energy source, you care about bioenergy.

So why not become a bioenergy expert by subscribing today (via PayPal or check — see below) for a year’s worth of issues of The Biomass Monitor at the low price of only $15 for individuals, $20 for nonprofits, and $25 for businesses?

Sincerely,

Josh Schlossberg, Editor (Denver, Colorado)
Samantha Chirillo, Associate Editor (Eugene, Oregon)

Editorial Board:
Roy Keene, Forester
Brett Leuenberger, Student
Dr. Brian Moench, Physician
Jon Rhodes, Hydrologist
George Wuerthner, Ecologist

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1 Year Individual Subscription – $15

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1 Year Nonprofit Subscription – $20

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1 Year Business Subscription – $25

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To subscribe via check, please email thebiomassmonitor@gmail.com for details.

[FEATURE] Out of the Fryingpan and Into the Fire: Debate Heats Up Over Clear-cutting in White River National Forest

– by Josh Schlossberg, March 8, 2017, Boulder Weekly

Conservationists are challenging a logging proposal that would clear-cut 1,300 acres in the White River National Forest northeast of Aspen, including endangered Canada lynx habitat and units adjacent to the protected Woods Lake Roadless Area.

The Upper Fryingpan Vegetation Management Project covers 1,848 acres in the Aspen/Sopris Ranger District in Eagle and Pitkin Counties, Colorado, with the goal of providing lumber and biomass energy, increasing the diversity of tree age and size, and creating snowshoe hare (Lepus americanus) habitat, the primary food source of the Canada lynx (Lynx canadensis).

However, a formal objection filed by Denver-based forest management analyst and consultant Rocky Smith, along with representatives from Rocky Mountain Wild, Rocky Mountain Recreation Initiative and a chapter of Great Old Broads for Wilderness, alleges the project would instead degrade habitat for lynx and other wildlife, disturb soils and watersheds, and impact scenery. Objectors say the U.S. Forest Service must draft an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) to detail the project’s potential harm to ecosystems and offer alternatives that would shrink its footprint.

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[SPRING 2018] DEBATE HEATS UP OVER BIOMASS ENERGY FROM NATIONAL FORESTS

To access this issue, please subscribe to quarterly issues of The Biomass Monitor.

[SPRING 2018] Debate Heats Up Over Biomass Energy from National Forests

FEATURE ARTICLE: Out of the Fryingpan and Into the Forest

OPINION (PRO): “Vegetation Management Project to Provide Forest Products, Biomass Energy” by Aspen/Sopris Ranger District, White River National Forest

OPINION (CON): “National Forest Project Bad for Environment and Climate” by Rocky Smith, Forest Management Analyst

[NEWS] Despite Advances, Costs Keep Wood Biocoal on Backburner

– by Frank Jossi, April 2, 2018, Energy News Network

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Photo: Energy News Network

At a research lab in the northwoods of Minnesota, scientists are roasting tree waste until it turns into something that looks and burns like coal — without the heavy metal pollution. The finished product is called “biocoal” or “torrefied biomass,” and a team of University of Minnesota-Duluth researchers hope it might someday displace coal to fuel power plants, reinvigorating the region’s forestry economy and reducing carbon emissions at the same time.

The work at the Natural Resources Research Institute lab, about 200 miles north of the Twin Cities, appears to be the latest technical advance for woody biomass. The team’s facility is able to produce as much as 6 tons per day of the biocoal, which has energy values similar to coal. It’s been successfully tested in a Milwaukee tourist train and a large, coal-fired power plant owned by Minnesota Power, the investor-owned utility in the area.

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[NEWS] Omnibus Draft: Biomass Energy “Carbon Neutral”

– by Dean Scott, March 21, 2018, Bloomberg

smokestack question markEmissions from forest biomass would continue to be treated as carbon-neutral and the EPA would be barred from regulating lead in bullets and fishing tackle under the draft omnibus spending bill, congressional aides told Bloomberg Environment.

Both the ammunition and forest biomass regulatory provisions would be retained from previous spending measures.

The biomass language would shield facilities that burn wood and other organic matter from greenhouse gas regulation. The forestry and paper industries have long sought to have biomass treated as carbon neutral, arguing that the decaying plant matter would eventually release its trapped greenhouse gas emissions.

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[NEWS] Northern Michigan University Explains Why Biomass Heating Facility Is Idle

– by Julie Williams, February 8, 2018, WLUC

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Photo: Julie Williams / WLUC

The Ripley plant at Northern Michigan University supplies steam to most of campus and plays a critical part in keeping Northern and its students comfortable.

“We provide all of the heat to all the buildings that don’t have their own boilers and it heats water, it heats air and also provides some steam for humidification,” said Gisele Duehring, Associate Director of Facilities.

Ripley expanded with a biomass plant in 2012 and 2013 that cost roughly 16 million dollars but right now it is not being used.

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