A Bioenergy Expert For 25 Cents A Week?

Are you tired of superficial, imbalanced, and inaccurate reporting by the media on the issues you care about most?

If so, what’s your budget for supporting in-depth and credible independent media sources dedicated to getting you the whole story?

If your answer is zero – and, for many of us, it is – then the domination of corporate and/or agenda-driven news sources should be no surprise.

As you know, the topic of energy is central to nearly everything going on in the world today. And keeping abreast of the latest developments in renewable energy is crucial to anyone with an interest in climate change and the environment.

But it’s impossible stay informed on renewable energy if you’re ignoring bioenergy, nearly half of all renewables in the U.S.!

Now in our ninth year of publication, The Biomass Monitor covers the latest science along with the entire spectrum of views on bioenergy, biomass, and biofuels, the most popular – and controversial – source of renewable energy.

Of course, The Biomass Monitor isn’t the only outlet reporting on bioenergy. Mainstream and alternative media occasionally cover the topic, though it’s typically done by journalists with a limited grasp of the relevant science, quoting the same handful of voices in a “he said, she said” fashion.

Environmental advocacy newsletters and industry trade journals make important contributions to our understanding of bioenergy, however each do so with their own particular bias and slant.

Only The Biomass Monitor provides balanced and comprehensive investigative reporting, a digest of mainstream and alternative news articles, and a wide variety of views – from scientists to industry to advocacy groups – all in a single publication, one stop shopping for all your bioenergy needs!

Keep your fingers on the pulse of bioenergy by subscribing to email issues of The Biomass Monitor for as low as $15 a year!

If $15 sounds steep, I understand. In these tough economic times, many of us are strapped for cash. But I ask you to consider what else $15 a year can get you.

For $15 you can get a single meal at a restaurant. On a monthly basis, we’re talking about just over a dollar a month – what you tip a barista for coffee or the bartender for beer.

That’s four cents a day! Chances are you’ve left that much in the “give a penny, take a penny” dish at the convenience store.

If you care about renewable energy, climate, forests, public health, and economics, then no matter your take on the energy source, you care about bioenergy.

So why not become a bioenergy expert by subscribing today (via PayPal or check — see below) for a year’s worth of issues of The Biomass Monitor at the low price of only $15 for individuals, $20 for nonprofits, and $25 for businesses?

Sincerely,

Josh Schlossberg, Editor (Denver, Colorado)
Samantha Chirillo, Associate Editor (Eugene, Oregon)

Editorial Board:
Roy Keene, Forester
Brett Leuenberger, Student
Dr. Brian Moench, Physician
Jon Rhodes, Hydrologist
George Wuerthner, Ecologist

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1 Year Individual Subscription – $15

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1 Year Nonprofit Subscription – $20

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1 Year Business Subscription – $25

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To subscribe via check, please email thebiomassmonitor@gmail.com for details.

[NEWS] Biomass Energy Becomes Lightning Rod in Race for New Hampshire Governor

– by Paul Steinhauser, August 29, 2018, Concord Monitor

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Photo: Concord Monitor

With New Hampshire paying some of the highest energy bills in the country, it’s no surprise that the issue’s front and center in this year’s campaign for governor.

The two Democratic challengers in the race – former state Sen. Molly Kelly of Harrisville and former Portsmouth Mayor Steve Marchand – have highlighted energy relentlessly this summer as they’ve touted their commitment to renewables and slammed Republican Gov. Chris Sununu on the issue. Sununu has spotlighted that he’s fighting to reduce energy prices for ratepayers.

A new TV ad by Kelly that hit the airwaves on Wednesday targeted Sununu for his controversial vetoes last month of two bills that would have aided the renewable energy industry.

Read more

[NEWS] Activists: Sustain Veto of New Hampshire Biomass Burning Bill

– by Glynis Hart, August 24, 2018, Eagle Times

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Photo: Eagle Times

Two bills about renewable energy sources — biomass burning and small electrical generation originators — that were vetoed by Gov. Chris Sununu June 19, drew public comment at the Claremont City Council meeting Wednesday. Citizens asked the council to vote against the biomass burning plants, and in favor of enhanced net-metering for small alternative energy systems like wind and solar.

Rebecca Mackenzie, representing ACTS Now, a Claremont group, read a letter with multiple signers, asking the council to support Sununu’s veto of Senate Bill (SB) 365, and to override the governor’s veto of a different bill, SB 446. The letter is circulating around the state in response to a movement by legislators to override the governor’s vetoes of the two bills.

Read more

[NEWS] OSHA: Inadequate Training Contributed to Biomass Worker Death

– by John Lippman, August 4, 2018, Valley News

6d696027d4a245adb817f74c9e320e47Biomass power plants, a warren of hazardous machinery, can be dangerous places to work, especially if care is not taken to ensure a safe working environment. This was made tragically clear when a young man was killed while working at Springfield Power last year.

And it could have been prevented had the biomass plant followed proper training procedures for employees and ensured that the plant’s equipment was properly safeguarded, according to a recent finding by the Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration.

Read more

[NEWS] Beet Ethanol Refinery Breaks Ground in North Dakota

– by Lisa Gibson, August 22, 2018, Ethanol Producer Magazine

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Photo: Lisa Gibson / BBI International

An ethanol plant that will process sugar beet tailings, as well as potato and pasta processing waste held a groundbreaking ceremony Aug. 22, despite the fact that construction already has begun on the 11-acre site. “We’ve already started some of the activities on this site, so this is more ceremonial,” said Kashev Rajpal, of BioMass Solution. “But we wanted to take time out to celebrate.”

BioMass Solution’s plant in Grand Forks, North Dakota, will use up to 500,000 tons annually of the process wastes, producing 16.5 MMgy of ethanol and generating D3 and D5 renewable identification numbers (RINs). The plant will use sugar beet processing technology developed by Biotechnika, which has one sugar beet ethanol plant operating in Poland. The process, according to Jacek Chmielewski, principal of BioMass Solution, is much like the corn-to-ethanol process, once the feedstock hits the fermentation step. The difference is in the feedstock processing.

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[NEWS] Anti-Waste Incineration Bill Fails in New York

– by Cole Rosengren, June 21, 2018, Waste Dive

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Photo: Jerry Jackson / Baltimore Sun

The New York State Assembly failed to pass A11214, meaning efforts to advance this proposed law are effectively stalled until the legislature returns for regular session in 2019. The last action on this bill was unanimous approval from the Assembly Ways and Means committee on June 19.

Circular enerG heralded this result and pushed back in a detailed statement, calling the bill’s claims “science fiction” and “bogus.”

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