A Bioenergy Expert For 25 Cents A Week?

Are you tired of superficial, imbalanced, and inaccurate reporting by the media on the issues you care about most?

If so, what’s your budget for supporting in-depth and credible independent media sources dedicated to getting you the whole story?

If your answer is zero – and, for many of us, it is – then the domination of corporate and/or agenda-driven news sources should be no surprise.

As you know, the topic of energy is central to nearly everything going on in the world today. And keeping abreast of the latest developments in renewable energy is crucial to anyone with an interest in climate change and the environment.

But it’s impossible stay informed on renewable energy if you’re ignoring bioenergy, nearly half of all renewables in the U.S.!

Now in our seventh year of publication, The Biomass Monitor covers the latest science along with the entire spectrum of views on bioenergy, biomass, and biofuels, the most popular – and controversial – source of renewable energy.

Of course, The Biomass Monitor isn’t the only outlet reporting on bioenergy. Mainstream and alternative media occasionally cover the topic, though it’s typically done by journalists with a limited grasp of the relevant science, quoting the same handful of voices in a “he said, she said” fashion.

Environmental advocacy newsletters and industry trade journals make important contributions to our understanding of bioenergy, however each do so with their own particular bias and slant.

Only The Biomass Monitor provides balanced and comprehensive investigative reporting, a digest of mainstream and alternative news articles, and a wide variety of views – from scientists to industry to advocacy groups – all in a single publication, one stop shopping for all your bioenergy needs!

Keep your fingers on the pulse of bioenergy by subscribing to email issues of The Biomass Monitor for as low as $15 a year!

If $15 sounds steep, I understand. In these tough economic times, many of us are strapped for cash. But I ask you to consider what else $15 a year can get you.

For $15 you can get a single meal at a restaurant. On a monthly basis, we’re talking about just over a dollar a month – what you tip a barista for coffee or the bartender for beer.

That’s four cents a day! Chances are you’ve left that much in the “give a penny, take a penny” dish at the convenience store.

If you care about renewable energy, climate, forests, public health, and economics, then no matter your take on the energy source, you care about bioenergy.

So why not become a bioenergy expert by subscribing today (via PayPal or check — see below) for a year’s worth of issues of The Biomass Monitor at the low price of only $15 for individuals, $20 for nonprofits, and $25 for businesses?

Sincerely,

Josh Schlossberg, Editor (Denver, Colorado)
Samantha Chirillo, Associate Editor (Eugene, Oregon)

Editorial Board:
Roy Keene, Forester
Brett Leuenberger, Student
Dr. Brian Moench, Physician
Jon Rhodes, Hydrologist
George Wuerthner, Ecologist

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1 Year Individual Subscription – $15

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1 Year Nonprofit Subscription – $20

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1 Year Business Subscription – $25

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To subscribe via check, please email thebiomassmonitor@gmail.com for details.

[NEWS] Why Biomass Remains a Challenge, Even in Timber-Rich Georgia

– by Gillian Neimark, June 16, 2017, Southeast Energy News

Albany Green biomass SE Energy NewsA new biomass plant under construction in Georgia highlights the challenging economics of the technology, even in a state so rich in forestry waste it exports it to other countries.

The 50 MW Albany Green plant – the largest renewable energy project in the state so far – is a unique collaboration among Georgia Power, private companies (including Procter & Gamble) and a nearby Marine base. While the cost for biomass generated electricity is too high to compete with wind and solar, the project also produces steam for industrial use, which improves its economics.

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[NEWS] Maine Lawmakers Put Biomass On Hold

– by Mike Clifford, June 12, 2017, Public News Service

woody biomass undark

Photo: Undark

Faced with key decisions on the best way to proceed on energy sources for Maine, state legislators have put off a bill to promote biomass, and moved forward on a measure to support solar power.

Dylan Voorhees, climate and clean energy director with the Natural Resources Council of Maine, said the measure approved Friday increases the number of participants in solar farms, including consumers, from 10 to 200. At the same time, Voorhees said the bill shortcuts actions that would roll back net metering as a revenue source for Mainers who install renewable energy.

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[NEWS] New Leadership for Troubled Good Earth Power AZ

– by Emery Cowan, May 27, 2017, Arizona Daily Sun

Good Earth Power Jake Bacon Arizona Daily Sun

Photo: Jake Bacon / Arizona Daily Sun

Three and a half years after taking over the largest stewardship contract in the Forest Service’s history, Good Earth Power AZ has new leadership that is looking to turn the company’s troubled operations around.

“The tactical execution hasn’t happened on this project, what we are trying to bring to it is tactical execution,” said Bill Dyer, the company’s new chief operating officer. “I can’t really change what has happened in the past, but we are trying to do the best we can to make it right.”

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[NEWS] Biomass Deal Will Increase Electricity Rates in Hawaii

– by John Burnett, May 27, 2017, Hawaii Tribune Herald

hu honua

Graphic: Hu Honua Energy

If Hu Honua Bioenergy’s long-delayed biomass power plant were to go online by the end of 2018, Hawaii Electric Light Company’s ratepayers would see increases in their electricity bills, according to an analysis HELCO filed Wednesday with the state Public Utilities Commission of a proposed power purchase agreement.

HELCO’s study used as its baseline the most recent power supply improvement plan, or PSIP, filed by HELCO in December, which includes how to gather 100 percent of energy from renewable sources such as solar, wind, water and biomass by 2045, a goal required by state law.

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[NEWS] Two New Biomass Processing Facilities Planned for Eastern Oregon

– by Rylan Boggs, May 30, 2017, Blue Mountain Eagle

johnday_orTwo biomass processing facilities are expected to be up and running in Grant County this summer.

Utilizing low-value vegetation from the Malheur National Forest, the Iron Triangle plants in Seneca and John Day will initially produce posts, poles and chips and could move into torrefied products, if the market is available. Torrefaction is the process of baking biomass into a coal-like fuel that can be burned.

The market for torrefied material depends on the Portland General Electric power plant in Boardman converting from burning coal to torrefied material, according to King Williams of Iron Triangle. PGE planned to convert the plant to biomass or shut it down entirely by 2020.

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[NEWS] New Law Allows Xcel to Shut Down Minnesota Biomass Facilities

– by Christine Bauman, June 11, 2017, Alpha News

minnesota biomass alpha news

Photo: Alpha News

Gov. Mark Dayton recently signed into law the omnibus jobs and energy bill allowing the Xcel Energy-managed Renewable Development Fund to be used to shut down three biomass power plants in Benson, Hibbing, and Virginia, Minnesota.

In 1994, Xcel Energy’s predecessor Northern States Power Co. wanted to expand their radioactive waste storage. The power company reached an agreement with the state, allowing an increase in nuclear storage in exchange for funding and development of clean energy alternatives. The Renewable Development Fund was created as a result of the agreement. Xcel was also required to use renewable sources, including biomass, for some of their energy production.

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[NEWS] New Hampshire House Passes Biomass Industry-Backed Energy Bill

– by Bob Sanders, June 7, 2017, NH Business Review

chip dump new hampshire biomass mag

Photo: Biomass Magazine

The NH House has overwhelmingly passed Senate Bill 129, a bill that boosts the wood and solar industry, but could also raise electric bills.

The bill, which was approved a 222-84 vote on June 1, has pitted the Business and Industry Association of New Hampshire against other business groups, such as the NH Clean Tech Council and the NH Timberland Owners Association.

The fight is far from over yet. The Senate still has to approve of House changes to the bill – which could happen on Thursday – or the measure could go to a committee of conference. And whatever emerges still could face a gubernatorial veto, if the BIA has its way.

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