[NEWS] Waste Incineration Shows Growth in New Jersey, Maine and Florida

– by Carl Weinschenk, October 20, 2016, Energy Manager Today

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Photo: Energy Manager Today

The waste to energy (WTE) sector is not huge, but it is showing signs of growing.

This week, New Jersey moved toward joining the ranks of states that require food waste to be utilized as an energy source. The rationale for the requirement is two-fold: Rotting food releases methane, which is a harmful greenhouse gas. Transitioning the material to energy would help alleviate that problem. And in addition to addressing the methane issue, the energy that is produced reduces reliance on fossil fuels.

The most important element of S771 is a requirement, starting on Jan. 1, 2019, facilities producing an average volume of 104 tons or more of food waste annually deliver it to a facility if it is within 25 miles, according to Biomass Magazine. There are provisions for situations in which the waste facility is more than 25 miles away or refuses to accept the waste. Other provisions will take effect on Jan. 1, 2022, according to the story.

It’s difficult to say definitively, but activity seems to be picking up in the broader world of WTE, which goes way beyond food. In a Q&A at WasteDIVE, Stephen Jones, the President and CEO of waste-to-energy (or energy-from-waste) firm Covanta suggested that the business is being driven by the increasing reluctance of companies to use landfills. At this point, however, the focus is on existing plants:

READ MORE at Energy Manager Today

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