Category Archives: crops

[NEWS] Hawaii Biomass Facility Reaches Agreement with Utility Over Power Purchase

– by H.J. Mai, May 10, 2017, Pacific Business News

hu honua pacific business journal

Photo: Hu Honua Bioenergy

Hu Honua Bioenergy LLC said on Wednesday that it has reached an agreement with Hawaii Electric Light Co. on an amended power purchase agreement for its half-completed biomass plant on the Big Island.

HELCO agreed to revised terms for electricity to be produced by the biomass project and is submitting the amended contract to the Hawaii Public Utilities Commission for approval of Hu Honua’s proposed pricing, according to a company statement.

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[NEWS] Former Georgia Gov. Sonny Perdue Confirmed as US Ag Secretary

– by Anna Simet, April 25, 2017, Biomass Magazine

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Photo: USDA

In an 87-11 vote, on April 24, the U.S. Senate confirmed Sonny Perdue as the 31st U.S. secretary of agriculture.

Perdue brings to the USDA a farming background and lengthy career of public service, ranging from Captain in the U.S. Airforce, to 11 years as a Georgia state Senator, to a two-term governor. As governor of Georgia, according to his USDA biography, Perdue was credited with transforming a budget deficit into a surplus, dramatically increasing student performance in public schools, and fostering an economic environment that allowed employers to flourish and manufacturers and agricultural producers to achieve record levels of exports.

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Biomass Energy: Carbon Neutral or Not? [SPRING 2017]

To access this issue, please subscribe to quarterly issues of The Biomass Monitor

Biomass Energy: Carbon Neutral or Not?

Study Assesses Economic Benefits of Biomass Energy on Rural Communities

OPINION: Middlebury College Declares Carbon Neutrality, Thanks to Biomass

OPINION: Middlebury Biomass Not Carbon Neutral 

[NEWS] New Study on Carbon Emissions from Bioenergy

– by Prachi Patel, January 26, 2017, Anthropocene

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Photo: Anthropocene

Many climate policies and models consider biomass carbon-neutral. The argument is that carbon emitted during burning the biomass is balanced out by the carbon that plants and trees sequester. But that understanding is flawed.

Biomass is indeed renewable, and burning biomass or biomass-derived fuels can offset fossil fuel use. However, cultivating and harvesting biomass, transporting it, and processing it for energy or to make liquid fuels all emits greenhouse gases. Exactly how the biomass is used—whether directly or turned into fuel—also makes a difference.

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[NEWS] Enzyme Shows Promise for Efficiently Converting Plants to Biofuels

– January 24, 2017, Phys.org

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Graphic: Phys.org

To make biofuels, tiny microbes can be used to break down plant cells. As part of that digestive process, specialized enzymes break down cellulose—a major molecule that makes plant cell walls rigid. Scientists showed that an enzyme, from the bacterial glycoside hydrolase family 12, plays an unexpectedly important role in breaking down a hard-to-degrade crystalline form of cellulose. Surprisingly, the enzyme breaks apart the cellulose via a random mechanism unlike other hydrolases.

Breaking down cellulose is a major challenge in developing more efficient strategies for converting plant biomass to fuels and chemicals. The discovery of a specialized enzyme that is highly effective at breaking down rigid plant cell wall components could be harnessed to solve this challenge.

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[NEWS] County-by-County Variability of Bioenergy Crop Yields in the U.S.

– January 20, 2017, Phys.org

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Photo: Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Using corn and soybeans as their testing ground, researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory devised methods to peer into the mechanisms that modulate crop yield variability. They used statistical models to examine how climate variability impacts yields of these popular bioenergy crops at the county level. Among climate factors, the team showed that temperature is predominant in corn-growing counties, both by volume and percentage of production. Precipitation has a similar impact. The amount of energy from the sun, or radiation, has a much smaller effect USA-wide on both soybeans and corn.

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