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A Bioenergy Expert For 25 Cents A Week?

Are you tired of superficial, imbalanced, and inaccurate reporting by the media on the issues you care about most?

If so, what’s your budget for supporting in-depth and credible independent media sources dedicated to getting you the whole story?

If your answer is zero – and, for many of us, it is – then the domination of corporate and/or agenda-driven news sources should be no surprise.

As you know, the topic of energy is central to nearly everything going on in the world today. And keeping abreast of the latest developments in renewable energy is crucial to anyone with an interest in climate change and the environment.

But it’s impossible stay informed on renewable energy if you’re ignoring bioenergy, nearly half of all renewables in the U.S.!

Now in our seventh year of publication, The Biomass Monitor covers the latest science along with the entire spectrum of views on bioenergy, biomass, and biofuels, the most popular – and controversial – source of renewable energy.

Of course, The Biomass Monitor isn’t the only outlet reporting on bioenergy. Mainstream and alternative media occasionally cover the topic, though it’s typically done by journalists with a limited grasp of the relevant science, quoting the same handful of voices in a “he said, she said” fashion.

Environmental advocacy newsletters and industry trade journals make important contributions to our understanding of bioenergy, however each do so with their own particular bias and slant.

Only The Biomass Monitor provides balanced and comprehensive investigative reporting, a digest of mainstream and alternative news articles, and a wide variety of views – from scientists to industry to advocacy groups – all in a single publication, one stop shopping for all your bioenergy needs!

Keep your fingers on the pulse of bioenergy by subscribing to email issues of The Biomass Monitor for as low as $15 a year!

If $15 sounds steep, I understand. In these tough economic times, many of us are strapped for cash. But I ask you to consider what else $15 a year can get you.

For $15 you can get a single meal at a restaurant. On a monthly basis, we’re talking about just over a dollar a month – what you tip a barista for coffee or the bartender for beer.

That’s four cents a day! Chances are you’ve left that much in the “give a penny, take a penny” dish at the convenience store.

If you care about renewable energy, climate, forests, public health, and economics, then no matter your take on the energy source, you care about bioenergy.

So why not become a bioenergy expert by subscribing today (via PayPal or check — see below) for a year’s worth of issues of The Biomass Monitor at the low price of only $15 for individuals, $20 for nonprofits, and $25 for businesses?

Sincerely,

Josh Schlossberg, Editor-in-Chief (Denver, Colorado)
Samantha Chirillo, Associate Editor (Eugene, Oregon)

Editorial Board:
Roy Keene, Forester
Brett Leuenberger, Student
Dr. Brian Moench, Physician
Jon Rhodes, Hydrologist
George Wuerthner, Ecologist

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1 Year Individual Subscription – $15

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1 Year Nonprofit Subscription – $20

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1 Year Business Subscription – $25

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To subscribe via check, please email thebiomassmonitor@gmail.com for details.

Don’t Be Kept in the Dark About Bioenergy: Subscribe to The Biomass Monitor

As of 2017, The Biomass Monitor is a paid subscription only publication.

We’ve decided that the best way to continue our balanced investigative reporting on all aspects of bioenergy, biomass, and biofuels is to sever all ties to agenda-driven foundations and generate our income solely from our loyal readers.

That’s why we’re offering a year’s worth of quarterly issues delivered right to your inbox for the low rate of $15 for individuals, $20 for nonprofits, and $25 for businesses.

Just scroll to the bottom of this email to subscribe today!

Whether you’re in the industry, an environmental or public health advocate, journalist, student, government agency staffer, elected official, or just bio-curious, you count on The Biomass Monitor to give you the nation’s most comprehensive look at this popular and controversial energy source.

Here’s a brief overview of what The Biomass Monitor has been offering you since 2010:

• Meticulously-researched, balanced, and high quality investigative journalism focused on the number one form of “renewable” energy in the U.S., bioenergy.

• Point-counterpoint opinion pieces published in each issue, where biomass supporters and critics debate important issues relevant to bioenergy, like climate change, public health, and forests.

• Monitoring, filtering, and distributing the latest bioenergy news from around the nation via our blog, Facebook, and Twitter. Our feed is one-stop shopping for anyone who wants to be kept in the loop on the latest bioenergy proposals, science, and politics.

• Free conference calls featuring experts speaking on various aspects of bioenergy.

• An extensive list of peer-reviewed scientific studies and reports relevant to bioenergy.

With everything that The Biomass Monitor delivers, surely you can agree that no other publication in the U.S. even comes close to what we’re doing. And, that with topics such as climate change, renewable energy, public health, and the environment becoming more and more crucial, we’re an important feature in today’s media landscape.

To ensure that you keep getting the whole story on nearly 1/2 of the nation’s renewable energy, subscribe today via PayPal for the low yearly rate of $15 for individuals, $20 for nonprofits, and $25 for businesses.

To pay by check, contact thebiomassmonitor@gmail.com for details.

images-22

1 Year Individual Subscription – $15

paypal_subscribe_150

1 Year Nonprofit Subscription – $20

paypal_subscribe_150

1 Year Business Subscription – $25

paypal_subscribe_150

Sincerely,

Josh Schlossberg, Editor-in-Chief (Denver, Colorado)
Samantha Chirillo, Associate Editor (Eugene, Oregon)

Editorial Board:
Roy Keene, Forester
Brett Leuenberger, Student
Dr. Brian Moench, Physician
Jon Rhodes, Hydrologist
George Wuerthner, Ecologist

[NEWS] California Seeks Way to Solve Biomass Problem

– by Christine Souza, August 26, 2016, AgAlert

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Photo: Cecilia Parsons

Across California, tens of millions of trees are dead, intense wildfires burn, and orchard and forest waste piles up, as more plants that convert wood waste into electricity close due to expiring contracts with utility companies.

“Nothing has been done to adjust the utility rates at the California Public Utilities Commission to account for the value that biomass has; they are not keeping track of all of the avoided pollution that it affords,” said Allan Krauter, senior administrative analyst for Kern County. “Unless and until the state is willing to make up the difference between the market price and the break-even price, they are going to continue to have a big biomass problem.”

The problem centers on 25- and 30-year contracts between biomass plants and utility companies, established in the 1980s, resulting in the construction of 66 power plants with an operating capacity of almost 1,000 megawatts. Now, only 22 biomass plants remain operating, with a total capacity of 532 MW—still enough to convert 7.3 million tons of wood waste into electricity.

Read more

[NEWS] Maine Trees Could Fuel Military Jets

– by Christopher Burns, August 20, 2016, Bangor Daily News

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(Cartoon: George Danby)

For the last decade, there has been a concerted push in the U.S. to replace petroleum-based fuel with plant-based biofuels in order to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and the nation’s reliance on foreign oil.

The alternative fuel revolution has so far belonged to corn, but efforts to develop a wood-based biofuel, particularly jet fuel, from Maine’s abundant timberland got a boost last month when the U.S. Department of Defense announced a $3.3 million investment into ongoing research at the University of Maine. This infusion comes as part of federal measures to help Maine’s flagging economy after a spate of mill closures.

This new investment from the federal government can potentially give the university’s Forest Bioproducts Research Institute the support it needs to “scale up” the production of biofuel for demonstration purposes to test it for commercial use, according to Jake Ward, the university’s vice president of innovation and economic development.

Read more

[NEWS] EPA Watchdog Says Government Fails to Study Ethanol’s Impact

– by Associated Press, August 18, 2016, ABC News

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Corn ethanol (Charlie Riedel/AP)

The Obama administration has failed to study as legally required the impact of requiring ethanol in gasoline and ensuring that new regulations intended to address one problem do not actually make other problems worse, the Environmental Protection Agency inspector general said Thursday.

The conclusion in the new audit confirmed findings of an Associated Press investigation in November 2013. The AP said the administration never conducted studies to determine whether air and water quality benefits from adding corn-based ethanol to gasoline. Such reports to Congress were required every three years under the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007.

The AP investigation described the ethanol era as far more damaging to the environment than the government predicted. As farmers rushed to find new places to plant corn, they wiped out millions of acres of conservation land, polluted water supplies and destroyed habitat.

The EPA agreed with the inspector general’s findings that it had failed to produce studies as legally required. It said it will produce the first report — on the impacts of biofuels — by December 2017, and investigate whether ethanol requirements made other environmental problems worse by September 2024. That will be 17 years after Congress passed a law requiring oil companies to blend billions of gallons of ethanol into their gasoline.

READ MORE at ABC News

[NEWS] Baker City, Oregon to Discuss Biomass Opportunities

– August 17, 2016, My Eastern Oregon

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Baker City, Oregon

A meeting has been arranged by Economic Development Director Greg Smith with PGE for next week in order for Baker County Commissioners as well as Baker City Representatives to discuss the opportunity to utilize Baker County bio mass in their generation for electricity.

According to Commissioner Mark Bennett with the recent fires and the upcoming “Face of the Elkhorns Project” Baker County is well situated to provide a significant source for the green power requirements of PGE.

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[NEWS] Health Commissioner Will Not Block Springfield, MA Biomass Facility

– by Dan Glaun, August 18, 2016, Springfield Republican

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Opposition to Springfield, Massachusetts biomass proposal (Lucas Ropek)

Health and Human Services Commissioner Helen Caulton-Harris will not initiate site assignment proceedings against the proposed East Springfield biomass plant, clearing a path for a project that has survived court challenges, city council opposition and protest from neighborhood organizers who describe the plant as a menace to public health.

Caulton-Harris wrote that opponents did not present convincing evidence that the plant would fail to meet EPA and MassDEP standards, and also that those standards are sufficient to protect residents.

“It is therefore decided that a site assignment hearing shall not be ordered for the project at this time,” Caulton-Harris wrote.

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