Tag Archives: landfill

[NEWS] $8 Million Landfill Gas Facility Breaks Ground in Ohio

– by Wendy Mitchell, November 3, 2016, Ledger Independent

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Rumpke Brown County Landfill (Photo: Ledger Independent)

Mountains of trash are being turned into utility resources in Brown County, Ohio.

On Thursday, state and local officials participated in a groundbreaking ceremony at the Rumpke Brown County landfill, designating the site as the place where methane from the decomposition of trash will be turned into usable electricity.

According to Rumpke officials, the approximately $8 million plant should be operational in late spring 2017.

“April is the goal to have it done,” said Molly Broadwater, Rumpke spokesperson.

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[NEWS] Landfill Gas Project Moving Forward in Idaho

– by Madelyn Beck, October 28, 2016, Idaho Mountain Express

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Milner Butte Landfill (Photo: Southern Idaho Solid Waste)

The Milner Butte Landfill’s gas-to-energy project is moving forward after a vote Wednesday by commissioners of counties that manage the southern Idaho facility.

The project would involve taking methane gas created by decomposing garbage and burning it for energy. The Milner Butte Landfill near Burley already captures methane and burns it off to limit the amount of the potent greenhouse gas that reaches the atmosphere, but it does not yet generate energy through the process.

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[NEWS] Detroit Incinerator Faces Lawsuit Over Emissions

– by Jim Lynch, October 18, 2016, Detroit News

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Detroit Renewable Power (Photo: Brandy Baker / Detroit News)

The Detroit incinerator, long controversial for its burning of the city’s waste, is being targeted by a lawsuit that claims the facility repeatedly fails to meet safe air emission standards.

Officials with the Great Lakes Environmental Law Center filed a notice of intent to sue incinerator operator Detroit Renewable Power. Like previous owners of the facility, the company takes in thousands of tons of trash each day for incineration.

The incineration produces steam and electricity that Detroit Renewable Power sells to DTE Energy. The process also produces air emissions that are considered harmful to the public.

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[NEWS] Incinerator’s Request for More Landfill Space Sparks Environmental Protests

– by Katie Lannan, July 26, 2016, WWLP

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Photo: WWLP

Environmental advocates and Saugus residents on Tuesday presented state officials with a petition and letters opposing a landfill capacity expansion for the trash incinerator, pledging to fight instead for the facility’s closure.

Addressing reporters outside the building that houses the Executive Office of Energy and Environmental Affairs, the group voiced concerns over potential environmental and community impacts of Wheelabrator Saugus’ request to expand its ash landfill.

Rep. RoseLee Vincent, a Revere Democrat whose district includes parts of Saugus, said the current fight against expansion of the landfill is the “first time ever that our voices are finally being heard.”

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[NEWS] Another Nail in Coffin of Maui Trash Incinerator Plan

– April 28, 2016, Maui News

big_maui_mapFor over three years a working group of recycling operators, advocates and others have commented on what we see as a bad deal for Maui County.

The proposed waste-to-energy plan presented by the Arakawa administration was characterized as a “no-cost” plan for handling Maui’s solid waste resource management issues. We have consistently challenged this project as unsustainable, fiscally disastrous and environmentally irresponsible.

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[NEWS] Maine Towns Vote Whether to Burn Trash or Make Biogas

– by Andy O’Brien, April 7, 2016, The Free Press

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Photo: Noimpactman.typepad.com

On March 31, 2018, it will no longer be economical for midcoast towns to send their household trash to the Penobscot Energy Recovery Co. (PERC) incinerator in Orrington. That’s the date when the facility loses a lucrative energy contract to sell its electricity at above market rates. With PERC out of the picture, two nonprofits are bitterly competing for thousands of tons of midcoast waste.

In one corner is the Municipal Review Committee, a municipal cooperative serving PERC’s 187 user communities and governed by representatives of its member towns. After determining that PERC was too expensive to continue running, the MRC developed a proposal with Maryland-based fiber-to-fuel company Fiberight and waste-to-energy giant Covanta to build a $67 million waste-to-biogas processing plant in Hampden. Fiberight claims it will be able to convert 100 percent of the organic material in the waste stream into compressed natural gas by using an anaerobic digestion process. In order to secure financing for the project, it needs a commitment from at least 80 percent of PERC’s user municipalities.

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Maryland Dumps Incineration

– by Mike Ewall, Energy Justice Network

VICTORY!!  For a second year in a row, pro-incinerator legislation in Maryland was defeated.  This stealthy legislation was written by Covanta (the nation’s largest trash incineration company) and would put Maryland on the path to burning nearly all of the waste that isn’t recycled.

The legislation takes the Renewable Portfolio Standard concept (which mandates a phase-in of renewable energy) and applies it to municipal solid waste (trash).  Without even mentioning incineration, this “Recycling and Landfill Diversion Portfolio Standard” would move the state toward increased recycling, but require that the remainder be diverted from direct dumping in landfills. Rather than move away from both landfills and incinerators, the bill would create the market for burning nearly all of the non-recycled waste in the state, before dumping the ash in landfills. This fits with efforts by many corporations and cities to hijack the concept of “zero waste” to make it mean “zero waste to landfill”— pushing incineration and pretending that the ash isn’t then dumped in landfills.

In 2011, Maryland was the first state to bump trash incineration into Tier I of their Renewable Portfolio Standard, putting it in competition with wind power. This awful idea, pioneered in Maryland, is now being pushed in several other states. Please look out in your state for these covert attempts to promote incineration in the guise of recycling and “landfill diversion.”

This bill in Maryland passed the Maryland House, but was stopped in the Senate when their Education, Health and Environmental Affairs Committee voted unanimously (11 to zero) to reject the bill. See www.energyjustice.net/md/ for more information on this and other pro-incineration bills we worked to stop (all of which are dead for this year).

Many thanks to all who helped stop this misguided legislation, most especially Greg Smith of Community Research and the following organizations: Assateague Coastal Trust, Chesapeake Physicians for Social Responsibility, Clean Water Action, Community Research, Crabshell Alliance, Energy Justice Network, Food & Water Watch, Free Your Voice, Institute for Local Self-Reliance, No Incinerator Alliance, Sierra Club, United Workers, Waste Not! Carroll, Wicomico Environmental Trust, and Zero Waste Prince George’s.