Tag Archives: recycle

[NEWS] Turning Trash Into Gas May Finally Be A Thing

– by Kenneth Miller, July 22, 2016, Take Part

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Photo: Max Whittaker

At WasteExpo 2016, the annual conference of the National Waste & Recycling Association, some 600 exhibits fill three cavernous floors of the Las Vegas Convention Center. Gleaming garbage trucks are on display, along with scrap metal shredders, conveyor belt systems, and pumps for spritzing deodorizer onto fetid landfills. Video screens show trash being sorted or baled, compacted or pulverized, by machines that resemble oversize Tonka toys.

The exhibitors are mostly male, and their fashion sense runs to the functional. Company-logo polos in cheerful colors predominate, tucked into khakis over middle-age paunches. But at the booth operated by a company called Sierra Energy, the vibe is different. The men’s shirts are black, and the tails hang over skinny jeans. There are women, too, in arty black dresses. The booth itself conveys an air of Zen-like mystery. What the hipsters are selling is nowhere to be seen. Instead, tufts of grass sprout from sleek pots on blond-wood tables. A banner shows two views of a trash heap—one in its unlovely natural hues, the other in a soothing shade of green. Superimposed on the images is a kind of koan: “I AM NOT GARBAGE. I AM FUEL. MONEY. OPPORTUNITY.”

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[NEWS] Another Nail in Coffin of Maui Trash Incinerator Plan

– April 28, 2016, Maui News

big_maui_mapFor over three years a working group of recycling operators, advocates and others have commented on what we see as a bad deal for Maui County.

The proposed waste-to-energy plan presented by the Arakawa administration was characterized as a “no-cost” plan for handling Maui’s solid waste resource management issues. We have consistently challenged this project as unsustainable, fiscally disastrous and environmentally irresponsible.

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Arizona Supreme Court Clears Way for Controversial Trash Incinerator

– by Arlene Karidis, February 12, 2016, Waste Dive

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Photo: Waste Dive

The Arizona Supreme Court has upheld the earlier decision of Arizona state utility regulators, ruling that it is acceptable for Mohave Electric Cooperative to burn trash to generate power at a facility proposed by Reclamation Power Group plant near Surprise.

The Arizona Corporation Commission had given Mohave Electric Cooperative the go-ahead five years ago, which fueled heated debate, particularly from the Sierra Club who filed a lawsuit stating that energy from burned trash is not renewable. But the appellate judges left the call to the Commission, and now the highest court’s final rule opens the door for Mohave to meet its renewable energy mandate through incineration. It also opens the door for Reclamation Power Plant to charge Mohave to absorb some of the cost and build the facility. Mohave in turn can impose a surcharge on its 39,000 customers to recoup some of its cost to deliver this alternative energy source.

The utility company would accept 500 tons of trash a day, recycle 25% of it, and burn what’s left to generate electricity.

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This Isn’t the First Time Flint Has Had a Lead Poisoning Crisis

– by Lydia Ramsey, January 26, 2016, Business Insider

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Photo: Sarah Rice/Getty

Flint, Michigan is in the middle of a major lead poisoning crisis.

But unfortunately, this isn’t the first time the residents of the city have come in contact with large amounts of lead.

In the 1990s, an incinerator near Flint used wood from demolished buildings to generate electricity. However, because the demolished houses contained a lot of lead paint, that lead (along with a host of other contaminates) made its way into Flint’s air.

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New Jersey Sierra Club Opposes Trash Incinerator

– by Kelly Nicholaides, January 21, 2016, North Jersey.com

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Photo: Jaimie Julia Winters

A proposal to build a waste energy plant to process 140 tons of household waste daily at the former Arsynco brownfield site on 511 Thirteenth St. is coming under fire from Jeff Tittel, director of the New Jersey Sierra Club, who is recommending that Carlstadt not sign an agreement for the first full scale Hydrothermal Decomposition plant in North America on the site.

However, the Pennsylvania-based Delta Thermo Energy, Inc.’s CEO Robert Van Naarden says Tittel has unrealistic goals and is spreading misinformation.

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