Tag Archives: the biomass monitor

Biomass Pellet Facility Opens in Utah

– by Erin Voegele, February 13, 2018, Biomass Magazine

active-energy_renewable-energy-magazineU.K.-based Active Energy Group plc has announced its CoalSwitch plant in Utah officially became operational the week of Feb. 5 and is producing the company’s high-calorific, high-bulk-density biomass pellet. Active Energy said biomass fuel produced at the facility will be prepared for delivery under offtake agreements that are already in place.

According to the company, CoalSwitch is produced primarily from forestry waste and other industrial cellulose waste products. The product can be fired with coal in existing coal-fired power plants at any ratio, up to 100 percent.

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The Biomass Monitor Listed Among Top 100 Energy Publications in World

Onalytica-Future-of-Energy-Top-100-influencers-brands-and-publications-CoverThe Biomass Monitor made the list of the top 100 most influential publications in the world relevant to the future of energy!

The report, Future of Energy: Top 100 Influencers, Brands, and Publications, by data analysis firm, Onalytica, ranked The Biomass Monitor #63 among publications such as Carbon Brief, E&E News, and the Washington Times.

Many thanks to all our readers and contributors who have played such an important role in getting out the whole story about bioenergy, biomass, and biofuels!

[WINTER 2017/2018] Inside the EPA-Certified Wood Stove Debate

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[WINTER 2017/2018] Inside the EPA-Certified Wood Stove Debate

FEATURE ARTICLE: Can EPA Wood Stoves Cut Indoor Air Pollution?

OPINION (PRO): EPA Wood Stoves Reduce Air Emissions

OPINION (CON): EPA Wood Stoves Still Pollute

Sustainable Biomass Program Under Scrutiny [FALL 2017]

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Sustainable Biomass Program Under Scrutiny (FALL 2017)

A Close Look at the Sustainable Biomass Program

OPINION: Sustainable Biomass Program: A Best Practice Certification System by Carsten Huljus, Chief Executive Officer, Sustainable Biomass Program

OPINION: Sustainable Biomass Program Green Lights Forest Impacts by Sasha Stashwick, Energy and Transportation Senior Advocate, NRDC

November ISSUE OF THE BIOMASS MONITOR: Should We Log Burned Forests for Biomass Energy?

Should We Log Burned Forests for Biomass Energy? [November 2016]

Inside this issue:

Forest Service Studies Soil Impacts of Bioenergy Logging

Forest Biomass Utilization Combatting Catastrophic Wildfires

The Disconnect Between Myth and Reality in the Rim Fire

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[AUDIO] Intro to Bioenergy

CONFERENCE CALL AUDIO: Intro to Bioenergy (August 2016) 

A 2015 Harris Poll found that 60% of Americans are unsure of the pros and cons of bioenergy. Making up 1/2 of all “renewable” energy in the U.S., it’s important for the public to educate itself on this prominent source of homegrown energy.

We speak with Ken Starcher, co-author of the new book, “Introduction to Bioenergy,” which takes a close look at the procurement and generation of biomass power and heating, and liquid transportation biofuels, while examining environmental impacts.

The Biomass Monitor conference calls are held the 3rd Thursday of every month. For the recording of this call and notice of future calls, go to thebiomassmonitor.org and subscribe to our free, monthly online journal investigating the whole story on bioenergy, biomass, and biofuels.

Biomass Energy Generating Controversy

– by Josh Schlossberg, September 1, 2016, Earth Island Journal

Kevin Bundy has tramped through his share of forests in California’s Sierra Nevada. Where he sees a diverse ecosystem of ponderosa pine, incense cedar, and white fir, prime wildlife habitats, and one of the world’s best buffers against climate change, many public and private land managers see something different. Of course, they too observe living forests, but they also see tinder for future wildfires, as well as an opportunity to procure home-grown, renewable biomass energy.

A senior attorney with the conservation group Center for Biological Diversity, Bundy works at the national level to ensure strict accounting of carbon emissions from the burning of biomass, and on the local level to limit the type of fuels burned by biomass facilities. He’s convinced that the nation needs to “get away from fossil fuels and shift to 100 percent renewable energy as quickly as possible,” given the threat of climate change. But while he acknowledges biomass might be renewable “in some sense,” he sees it as “something of a false solution to our climate and energy challenges” compared to other renewable sources like solar and wind.

Yet biomass is big business in the United States. In 2014, half of “renewable” energy in the US came from bioenergy – that is, from burning trees, crop residues (most often from corn and soybean harvests), manure, and even trash to produce electricity and heat, or to manufacture liquid transportation fuels like ethanol or biodiesel. Meanwhile, hydropower accounted for 26 percent, wind made up 18 percent, and solar accounted for a mere 4.4 percent. A significant increase in biomass energy production is likely as the US tries to ramp up its renewables output.

There remains considerable debate about just how prominently biomass should feature in energy planning, what with disagreements about the impact it has on forests and agricultural land, how clean it is, and its contributions to climate change. Much of the public is also confused about how biomass compares to other forms of renewable energy. This confusion reflects the conflicting scientific opinions and government policies regarding biomass energy.

READ MORE at Earth Island Journal